New Census Data Show That California’s Poverty Rate Remained High in 2012, Despite Economic Recovery

A new CBP report looks at the Census Bureau data released yesterday, which show that despite the state’s emerging economic recovery, California’s poverty rate was essentially unchanged in 2012 — at 15.9 percent — and remained about one-third higher than in 2006, the year before the recession began. The new Census data show that more than 6 million Californians had incomes below the federal poverty line and that 2.1 million of the state’s children — nearly one out of four — were living in poverty.

The new Census data also show that the state’s median household income in 2012 was $57,020, nearly 10 percent below what it was in 2006, after adjusting for inflation. One positive trend in the new Census data is in the area of health coverage, with a significant year-to-year drop in the share of Californians who are uninsured as well as longer-term gains in providing health coverage for children.

Like our recent report on employment and earnings in California, this new analysis underscores that many of the state’s residents continue to face severe economic challenges in the aftermath of the Great Recession. That’s why it’s critical that policymakers sustain a strong social safety net for individuals and families, while also making the necessary public investments in education, job-related services and supports, and other foundations of widely shared economic growth.

— Steven Bliss